Select Works

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marking a moment

Dec 11, 2017 — Jan, 7 2018
University Club of Chicago, 76 East Monroe St
Photo Credit: Megan Noe

This exhibition was a solo exhibition of monoprints from different bodies of work made in 1984, 1990, and 2017.

 
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a meeting of two: shock and awe in a post causal era

exhibited in Rube Goldberg’s Ghost: Confounding Design and Laborious Objects, Feb 28 – May 4, 2013
Glass Curtain Gallery, Columbia College Chicago
Curated by Elizabeth Burke-Dain

an excerpt from the catalog: “Rube Goldberg’s Ghost: Confounding Design and Laborious Objects presents contemporary artworks that offer plausible deniability toward some of society's current obsessions, ills and issues. Rube Goldberg’s complicated contraptions and their absurdist answers to real problems are at the heart of this exhibition.”



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(out)looking, (re)framing

May 20 — Nov. 27, 2011
Morton Arboretum,
4100 Illinois Highway 53, Lisle.
Photo credit: Tom Nowak
Engineering Consultant: Michael Flynn

During a visit to the site, I was struck by the landscape’s subtle and modest views and the hues in and around the trees and other vegetation. I have always been fascinated by the abstractions created by tree branches and leaves seen against the sky, and this in part inspired this response to the site. For the exhibition, I stationed a teleidoscope on the grounds, providing opportunities for different kinds of reflection and delight in the surrounding natural areas. 

A teleidoscope is a cylindrical viewing device housing a lens at one end, having an arrangement of mirrors in the interior, and providing an open view to the surrounding environment. The optics of a teleidoscope is similar to that of a kaleidoscope, an object familiar to children and adults alike. Peering through the teleidoscope, the viewer will see a composition of fragments made whole into a beautifully colored abstract composition. 

Commissioned for Nature Unframed: Art at the Arboretum, following the exhibition, the teleidoscope became part of the Arboretum’s permanent sculpture collection, sited in the children’s garden area.